Two in three Britons are actively cutting down on sugar after warnings from health experts that it’s ‘the new tobacco’. Sugar is the prime cause of obesity and associated ill health which include type 2 diabetes, heart attacks, some forms of cancer and tooth decay in children.

According to a latest consumer research 62 per cent cent of consumers are actively trying to reduce sugar in their diets.

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Two in three Britons are actively cutting down on sugar after warnings from health experts that it’s ‘the new tobacco’ (file photo)

Of those, a fifth claim they have begun to avoid all sugary products while 75 per cent claim they are buying fewer products of this kind.
Nearly 50 per cent of the people who have altered their eating habits have ditched sugary fizzy drinks and a third have cut down on fruit juice.
Nearly one in three are purchasing more low or no-sugar food products, for example, reduced-sugar tomato ketchup.
The figures validate the results of a study by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) which discovered that sugar has turned the number one food issue for consumers for the first time.

‘EAT NO MORE THAN SEVEN TEASPOONS OF SUGAR A DAY’, GOVERNMENT RECOMMENDS

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Adults need to limit the amount of sugar in their diet to only seven teaspoons or cubes a day, experts advised the Government (file photo)

Adults need to limit the amount of sugar in their diet to only seven teaspoons or cubes a day – half what is presently recommended, experts advised the Government.
The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) said the move, which will imply one can of Coke is more than a person’s daily sugar quota, is crucial if we are to try and battle spiralling obesity levels and stem the diabetes crisis.
The new advice says children aged 11 or over and adults should consume no more than seven teaspoons of added sugar a day – 30g, equal to less than a single can of Coca-Cola, which contains 39g.
Children need to eat much less than that. The report recommends around 19g for children aged four to six (around the amount of sugar in a pouch of Capri Sun) and approximately 24g for children aged seven to 10 (around the amount of sugar in a Snickers bar).
Cutting back sugar intake for children will help lower the risk of tooth decay – a common problem today.
The recommendation takes into account free sugars, those which are added to food.
They include sucrose or table sugar, glucose and those naturally found in honey, syrups and unsweetened fruit juices.

Precisely 50% of the people listed sugar as a concern, placing it ahead of food waste at 49%, salt at 47% animal welfare at 43% and prices at 42%.
Significantly, it said women were more prone to report concern regarding each individual wider food issue with 54% of females raising sugar as a concern compared to 48% of males.

A month ago, Government advisors released new guidelines urging adults to halve their sugar intake to 30g a day – just seven teaspoons.

Meanwhile, Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England, said worries regarding high sugar consumption implies there was ‘absolutely no reason’ that children should drink fizzy drinks.

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A month back month, the chief executive of NHS England, said worries regarding high sugar consumption implies there was ‘absolutely no reason’ that children should drink fizzy drinks (file photo)

Such is the concern that Tesco took a decision to stop selling high sugar Ribena drinks targeted at children in a controversial move that has upset a few customers.

DIABETES TOLL RISES

Diabetes is bringing on more heart attacks, strokes and amputations than ever before, according to official figures.
Hospitals in England and Wales treat 200,000 cases in one full year in which the condition has brought on complications – up 11 per cent in two years.
This includes 18,000 heart attacks, 22,000 strokes and 5,500 amputations, reports the National Diabetes Audit – which checked figures from 2010/11 to 2012/2013.