This simple exercise of sitting down and standing up again without holding onto anything, is an effective way to find out how long you have to live.

A group of physicians came up with the ‘sitting-rising test’ to measure their patients’ flexibility and strength. They believe this test accurately predicts the life expectancy of the patient.

They devised a scoring system for the test and discovered that patients who scored three points or less out of 10, were more than five times as likely to die within six years, versus those who scored more than eight points.

longlive-exercises

This simple exercise of sitting down and standing up again without holding onto anything, is an effective way to find out how long you have to live. This infographic demonstrates how to take the ‘sitting rising test’

Claudio Gil Araujo, of Gama Filho University in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was one of the doctors who pioneered the sitting rising test (SRT) to instantly assess the flexibility of athletes, however, he currently uses it to persuade his patients that they need to stay active to maintain their muscle and balance, and live longer, Discover Magazine reported.

As we grow older, our muscles start to become weaker and a loss of balance means we are increasingly likely to fall.

Prevalent methods to test frailty can be time-consuming, impractical and inaccurate for small doctors’ surgeries, nonetheless experts are keen to keep older people moving.

Dr Araujo says SRT is a simple test that requires no equipment.

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As we grow older, our muscles start to become weaker and a loss of balance means we are increasingly likely to fall. Doctors are keen for older people to keep moving – a stock image of  a class in Florida is pictured.

TAKE THE SITTING RISING TEST

  • WARNING: It’s not advised for those with arthritis.
  • Wearing comfortable clothes and no shoes, ensures you have lots of space around you.
  • Lower yourself into a cross-legged sitting position, without leaning on anything.
  • Stand up again without using your hands, knees or arms to push yourself up.
  • Get someone to score you, take the test in front of a mirror to notice any wobbles or ‘cheats’.
  • The first part of the test –sitting down – is scored out of five, as is the second part –standing up – making a total score of 10.
  • Subtract one point every time you use a hand or knee for support.
  • Dock half a point every time you noticeably lose balance and wobble and combine them to calculate your final score.
  • The study discovered that every point increase in the test, was associated with a 21 per cent drop in mortality from all causes.

The researchers who did the study illustrated how 2002 adults aged between 51 and 80 took the SRT at Clinimex Exercise Medicine Clinic in Rio.

The experts discovered that those who scored fewer than eight points out of 10 on the test, were twice as likely to die within the next six years, compared with people with more perfect scores.

One point was subtracted each time a participant used their hand or knee for support to either sit down or stand up, while half a point was subtracted for losing their balance.

They found that participants who scored three points or fewer, were more than five times as likely to die within the same period.

They wrote in the study: ‘Musculoskeletal fitness, as assessed by SRT, was a significant predictor of mortality in 51–80-year-old subjects.’

Healthy people in the age range 60 to 64 years are expected to stand and sit more than 12 times for women and 14 times for men in 30 seconds. A good score for a 90 to 94-year-old is siting and standing more than seven times for man and four times for women.