Do you feel naked and afraid without it? Stop being worried, you’re not alone.

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Is this an accurate description of how you feel when you leave your phone at home?

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A latest study shows that nomophobia—the fear of not having your mobile phone on you—is as legit as being afraid of heights.

A study was undertaken by researchers at Iowa State University in which college-aged men and women were put questions to figure out whether they could be considered “dependent” on their phones.

A group of four men and five women picked for the study owned a smart phone for at least a year, had Internet on their phone, spent more than an hour a day on it, and scored the highest on a test that assessed their dependence on their phone.

Researchers asked each person wide-ranging questions like how they would feel if they left their phone at home and couldn’t use it all day and whether or not they would feel anxious if they wanted to use their phone but couldn’t. Based on their answers researchers created a questionnaire to help identify someone who might have nomophobia.

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That questionnaire was next passed on to 300 students that led to discovery of the reasons the participants were most afraid of not having their phone: not being able to communicate, losing their connection to others, not being able to get information online, and giving up convenience.
One fact worth noting here is that all of the participants are undergraduate students, who might use their phone more than other adults. That limits the results of the study. Researchers say that it calls for more research to find out if the nomophobia assessment applies to other groups of people.

Go through these statements from the study authors’ survey to see how many you agree with. If there are many that sound like you, you likely have nomophobia.

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1. I would feel nervous without constant access to information through my smartphone.
2. I would be irritated if I could not look information up on my smartphone when I wanted to do so.
3. I would feel uncomfortable if I am not able to get the news (e.g., happenings, weather, etc.) on my smartphone.
4. I would be annoyed if I could not use my smartphone and/or its capabilities when I wanted to do so.
5. I would panic if my smartphone battery runs out.
6. If I were to hit my monthly data limit, I would panic.
7. If I didn’t have a data signal or I’m unable to connect to Wi-Fi, then I would repeatedly check to see if I had a signal or could find a Wi-Fi network.
8. If I’m unable to access my smartphone, I would be scared of getting stranded somewhere.
9. If I haven’t checked my smartphone for a while, I would feel an urge to check it.
10. If I have left my smartphone at home, I would feel anxious because I could not at once communicate with my family and/or friends.
11. I would be anxious because my family and/or friends could not reach me.
12. I would feel uncomfortable because I would be unable to receive text messages and calls.
13. I would be worried because I could not keep in touch with my family and/or friends.
14. I would be upset because I could not know if someone had tried to get a hold of me.
15. I would be worried because my constant connection to my family and friends would be broken.
16. I would be tense because I would be cut off from my online identity.
17. I would be restless because I could not stay up-to-date with social media and online networks.
18. I would feel awkward because I could not check my notifications for updates from my connections and online networks.
19. I would be worried because I could not check my email messages.
20. I would feel weird because I would not know what to do